decision-making-9

decision-making-9

3-4 – slide PowerPoint please(3 will be fine)

There are some different forms of arguments that could be made, as follows:

  • Categorical Arguments: An assertion that there is 1 of 4 relationships between X and Y. You could show these 4 forms as follows:
    • All Xs are Ys.
      • Example: All mice are mammals.
    • No Xs are Ys.
      • Example: No mice are mammals.
    • Some Xs are Ys.
      • Example: Some mice are mammals.
    • Some Xs are not Ys.
      • Example: Some mice are not mammals.
  • Predictive Arguments: A case is made for anticipating or predicting events based on the characteristics of a category (X or Y) or based on the relationship between X and Y. Some sample arguments are below (the combination of X and Y is not represented).
    • All Xs have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about X.
      • Example: All mice eat cheese. Therefore, the cheese on the table will be eaten by the mouse on the table.
    • All Ys have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about Y.
      • Example: All cheese will be eaten by mice. Therefore, the cheese on the table will be eaten by the mouse on the table.
    • Some Xs have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about X.
      • Example: Some gray mice eat cheese. Therefore, the cheese on the table may be eaten by the gray mouse on the table.
    • Some Ys have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about Y.
      • Example: Some yellow cheeses are desired by mice. Therefore, the yellow cheese on the table may eaten by the mouse on the table.
    • No Xs have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about X.
      • Example: No mice have been found to have 2 tails in this region. Therefore, the mouse in this region will have 1 tail.
    • No Ys have this characteristic, behave this way, or are in this state. Therefore, I predict __ about Y.
      • Example: No ballots were left uncounted. Therefore, the voting system should be fair and equitable.
  • Change Arguments: A case can be made that something is different in the characteristics (or state) of X and/or Y between 2 or more observations made at different times. A change argument is simply a comparison of before and after and any differences that are noted from the first observation to the subsequent observations. When making a case for observed change, then you would typically use a different form of argument (categorical or predictive) to explain why that change occurred.
    • Example:
      • At observation 1, all Xs had this characteristic (or were in this state).
      • At observation 2, all Xs do not have this characteristic (or were not in this state).
      • Therefore, X no longer possesses this characteristic (or is no longer in this state).

Imagine that you now have to present your solution to your retail store client. You need to make a formal presentation to a group of stakeholders, and you need to be prepared to answer their questions. Create a PowerPoint presentation in which you provide the following:

  • In the notes pages of each slide and based on the context of the information on that slide, provide a narrative of 2–3 paragraphs of your rationale for the solution to the problem that is described in the IP.
  • On each slide, identify the type(s) of argument(s) that you are making for the problem presented in the unit IP and the evidence that you have to support the argument(s)